Sydney

Hydrostadium made the design of the course for the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games

Through lack of a white water stadium, the organisation committee decided to cross of the kayak slalom race for the Olympic Games. Thanks to a persisting lobbying, this sport managed to gain its reintegration and Hydrostadium is very proud of having participated by providing its engineering. For this occasion, the most beautiful artificial white water stadium in the world was built. So the kayak and slalom ompetitions have be reintegrated into the programm and the French athlete Tony Estanguet became Olympic champion.

The course is based in Penrith, at 60 kilometres (37 miles) of Sydney. Penrith hosted the Olympic canoeing (slalom and sprint) and rowing events. The white water stadium uses the water from the lakes that fill former gravel pits. The water supply for the white water channel is provided by a pumping station. The U-shaped positions the finish near the starting line. A pumping station fitted with 6 pumps supplies the white water stadium with a maximum flow rate of 16.8 m³/sec. A boat conveyor provides users with an easy link between finishing and starting area without disembarking.

Thanks to mobile EDF obstacles, the Penrith course can host high level canoeing competitions or can be used for leisure activities. This ensures the profitability of the amenities. Thus, the white water stadium turned towards a commercial use, as a monthly turn-over of 100 000 Australian dollars (61 000 €) and allows a benefit of a quarter of this sum.

 

Sydney
Sydney

 

Sydney
Sydney
 

Characteristics of the Penrith white water stadium

Water supply Pumping station
Flow rate 4 to 16.8 m³/s
Length 320 m
Width 8 to 14 m
Drop 5.2 m
Difficulty II to IV
  • Cost of the installation: 6,500,000 Australian dollars – 3,960,000 euros including operational buildings
  • Builder: Pacific Power International with the EDF assistance
  • Work done by EDF: Mobile obstacles supply
  • Opening date: March 1999
  • Main events: Pre-Olympic competitions in September 1999 and Olympic Games in September 2000.

 

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